Noisy Computer Servers

July 19th, 2016

Noisy computer servers are distracting to work nearby to say the list and can have serious effects on one the health of people who are exposed to it hours at a time. This has prompted many people and companies to try to enclose the servers in soundproof enclosures, however this leads to a heat buildup that can permanently damage the servers. So far the solution has been to build “server rooms” this adds a tremendous real estate cost to many companies. Additionally this would not be a solution when you need the server close by as by trade shows or for noisy lab equipment.
Now a new solution has hit the market a soundproof enclosure with fans to dissipate the heat and the noise generated by the fans? taken cane of using Active Noise Control Technology.

Finally something to help sound control for windows

May 15th, 2016

We have been waiting a while to find the correct product to help control sound coming in or going out through your windows. While there are solutions as in adding another window in front of your existing window we do not think that is too practical. Now we have come across a removable Window Soundproof Panel attached with velcro this can be put up and taken down as needed. It is available with a covering which is a great light blocker too, in addition to being available in a clear see through vinyl. Check it out and if you use it please comment below to let our readers know if they work well.

DJ Derek Sighting

January 14th, 2016

A new lead has emerged in the search for DJ Derek. A photo potentially captures “Britain’s oldest DJ” at Waterloo station in London on 23 December.

While there have been other alleged sightings since his disappearance in July, the family of Derek Serpell-Morris, 74, are said to be taking the latest lead more seriously because of the scarf and hat the person is pictured wearing matches one worn by the DJ, according to the Bristol Post.
Read more at the guardian

How to soundproof

December 31st, 2014

This new and updated article on “How to soundproof” is the best we have seen out there to date. Clearly explained with vivid graphics this article is a must read whether your soundproofing a room, an office building or your basement. Sound is an issue and what used to once a nuisance from the outside is now a nusiance in your own home as well. With game consoles and large HD TV’s creeping into homes you may want your own quiet bedroom. Be sure to read that article and comment below on your thoughts.

You can read more on noise pollution here

Soundproofing a door

May 28th, 2014

Search Soundproofing a door and your bound to find a myriad of confusing advice including using styraoam panels, egg cartons and who knows what else.

The 3 main components to properly soundproofing a door is;

  1. Mass
  2. Damping
  3. Sealing

Get those three components straight and you’ll have a properly soundproofed door for a fraction of the price. Here is a straightforward article explaining these three steps

http://www.tmsoundproofing.com/How-To-Soundproof-a-Door.html

If you prefer to buy a ready made acoustic door be prepared to spend between 2 to 4 thousand dollars something like this one http://www.kriegerproducts.com/acoustical/

Quantico, VA Study Centers around Soundproofing

January 21st, 2014

In Quantico, VA, a JLUS study compiled by Quantico as well as Stafford County has both military and local officials working to create better sound control measures.

Of particular interest is the noise created by the Quantico Marine Corps Base. The demolition range, in particular, produces noises and booms loud enough to shake homes, if not just windows. The studies are looking to protect homes both in and around the base, especially in areas where residents have been complaining.

The plan specifically focuses on the areas around VA 610. It would focus on residential homes but hospitals, daycares, sports centers, and other commercial structures would not be included.

The Joint Land Use Study estimates that it would cost approximately $10,000 to soundproof each home. This cost is not too much different, in comparison, to soundproofing a new home while it is still under construction. The study also suggests making a noise disclosure mandatory for any home sold in the Military Influence Area.

The impact Quantico has on the local economy is huge, so keeping the base and local residents happy is paramount.

Yarra Town Council Looks to Help Music Venues

December 18th, 2013

Simon Huggins, a Yarra councillor, is taking action to help well-established music venues in the area. It seems as though multiple venues are being threatened with legal action due to noise complaints. The sheer number of complaints, however, is a concern, as government officials don’t want to see complaints ultimately destroy the town’s vibrant music industry and nightlife.

So what did Huggins propose? He proposed creating a fund to assist in the high costs of soundproofing older buildings. He’s found that some of the longer-standing venues are failing to meet EPA guidelines in buildings that were built before the guidelines were put in place.

Whatever measure he proposes wouldn’t necessarily help new venues in newer buildings, but would focus more on helping long-established venues in older or historic buildings find ways to more effectively and affordably control noise.

The budget hasn’t been completely mapped out. There’s no detailed plan. We hope to see one, though. It’d be amazing to see a city that values music take action to help the venues that give it life.

Massachusetts DOT to Remove a Soundproof Wall

November 11th, 2013

Residents of Newburyport, a town in Massachusetts, were surprised during their October MassDOT public briefing meeting.

The state has been working on a project to replace the Whittier Bridge and improve sections of I-95. The October meeting held in Amesbury High School was held to address the concerns the public had about the project and to show what the wider highway would look like.

As part of the project, the current soundproofing wall between the highway and the neighborhood will be removed. The current wall is 12 feet wide and the new wall will be thinner. The new wall will be constructed in a slightly different place, allowing for the growth of some brush and foliage, which will also help to soundproof the area.

Residents were concerned that MassDOT officials were constructing a wall that would not properly buffer sounds, but a spokesperson for the agency said any new wall would have the same sound-buffering qualities as the original.

It’ll be interesting to see what actually happens to the noise levels once this project is complete.

Adelaide Hospital Receives Soundproofing

October 7th, 2013

Have you ever had the opportunity to see a rescue helicopter in action? The specialized crew searches for an open field, they quickly wisk away accident victims, and they land on the roof of the nearest trauma center. There, more trained professionals scurry to the rescue.

The process is a good one – unless you happen to be one of the hospital patients who happens to have a room directly beneath the helicopter landing pad. In that case, the process seems counterproductive, especially considering all of the studies that show how disruptive and counterproductive hospital noise can be.

According to news.com.au, the Royal Adelaide Hospital is participating in a test program run by CSIRO. They’re opening a new hospital in two years, and they want to make sure the “rock concert”-like sound from rescue helicopters doesn’t become too much of an issue.

They’ve literally been building walls, testing sound levels, knocking the walls down, and building them again. It’s a serious process designed to make sure the project can be expanded to larger areas of the hospital with success.

Soundproofing is serious business, especially when it comes to outrageously loud noises. We can’t wait to see how this project ultimately turns out.

Would you pay $3,000/month for a home?

September 17th, 2013

That’s one of the questions being asked in Michigan where, in the Grand Rapids area, visitors are given tours of the Union Square condominium building.

As a condominium building, the facility is only 7 years old. As a structure, it’s more than 100-years old, formerly the home of a high school.

While moderately sized at 1,900 square feet, the units inside aren’t cheap, priced at $3,000 per month. The developers did upgrade the building, though. The windows are insulated and the entire structure has had soundproofing material built in – a nice amenity for a building set next to a five-lane highway.

They are nice units for those with a lavish lifestyle. Each has two floors, large bathrooms, decks for lounging, bamboo bedroom flooring, marble showers, and more.

I just can’t get over the proximity to the highway. Even with soundproofing, I’m not sure I’d way to pay $3,000/month for that type of view!